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for certainty and policy decisions. >> earlier today, the ranking member of the senate energy committee, lisa murkowski releaser blueprint for congressional energy policy, which includes drilling in the arctic wildlife refuge also proven keystone xl pipeline. she also discuss climate change issues and why it's important to find common ground in passing future legislation. part of the annual meeting of the national association of regulatory utility commissioners, this is half an hour. [applause] >> thank you and good morning. it's -- i don't know, am i looking at a group of non-football fans? [laughter] i have to tell you, one of the benefits of being from the last to and watching something like the super bowl is our super bowl begins at 2:00 in the afternoon and you're done by 6:00, 630 clock until the kids it's time to do your homework. back here, this thing goes on all night. so i don't know. it showed me out a little bit this morning, but we have the 35 minute reprieve or we could go into a little homework done. so worked for me. i don't know about you. i am honored to be with you yet agai
energy policy. >> i have the book. you have all been waiting for it and take you for giving me the opportunity to talk a little bit about what we have been doing on the energy committee for the past year in an effort to really focus on where we have been with energy policy and really helping to move forward in a way that is not the same old same old, but really real imagining and refocusing where we should be has been an important opportunity for us to really put some considered thought into the proposal. what you have in front of you is better than airplane reading. there are some suggestions in this energy 2020 document that people will look at and they will argue and they will say -- that is one person's view. that is true, that is true. but while we are trying to do is not give you a legislative package starting with initiatives that we are going to kind of clicked off as we move forward. this is really designed to be a discussion blueprint. we want to try to change the conversation. one of the reasons we have to think about changing the conversation is because the energy p
, that is a great question. triet its current to metastasize tree we are seeing growth in the energy sector through oil and gas you are always finding new fields. ghana is an example in the industry that keeps booming. there are other places around west africa and in this region there's a potential for the oil and gas of in certain quadrants between the borders of mali and more tammie as a you have companies, western companies that are out looking for this. exxonmobil, vp, offshore, all these companies are out there so you have the westerners operating in the region, and if you start seeing the tax like the one that we saw in algeria, that is when to cause some impact economically you are going to see that. the other thing is there is -- i will use france as an example from the four ret base you have 10% of the french population is of some percentage in north africa whether it is first, second, third, fourth generation. you have individuals from within these groups that are sympathetic to the cause or the islamist cause in the region. if you keep this unchecked what you have is a migration flow of
the house stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. for morning hour debate. >> later, senate energy committee ranking member senator murkowski reveals his ideas for energy policy. then john kerry speaks to state department employees. >> a single thing that coolidge did that we want to remember is, when he left office, the budget was lower than when he came in. that is the story for us now. how did he do that? the economy grew a lot. maybe more than three percent sometimes. unemployment was below five percent. the budget was balanced due to his own money. had he managed to keep -- the budget go lower. how did that help the economy? he got the government out of the way of the economy. >> tracing the life of the 30th president of the united states in oakland coolidge." "coolidge."t -- oh quot >> they heard from newark mayor cory booker immigrants leaders. democratic senator joe manchin of west virginia and former gop presidential candidate jon huntsman. this is two hours. >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome marianne huntsman and abby huntsman. [applause] family"] ♪ >> we are family. we are
and in their neighborhoods, and economics will always play a role in that. next, think about energy and climate change. managing the world's energy supplies in a way that minimizes conflict and supports economic growth while protecting the future of our planet is one of the greatest challenges of our time so we are using both high- level international diplomacy and grass-roots partnerships to curb carbon emissions and other causes of climate change. we've created a new bureau at the state department focused on energy diplomacy as well as new partnerships like the u.s.-e.u. energy council. we've worked extensively with the iraqis to support their energy sector because it is critical to their economy and stability. we have intensified our efforts to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean. this has been helped significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. as iranian oil has gone offline, other oil has gone online. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. universal rights exist. governments are obligated to protect them. we're at the fro
it a more perfect union our way. tonight, i feel this energy and hope. when i began in new york, my metaphor was i was a prisoner of hope. the challenges looked so great. every month, my staff would come in with a new problem that we did not realize was there. i wouldn't look at them and say, i am a prisoner of hope. [laughter] seven years as the mayor of the city of newark, where we have ushered in our biggest development in our economy, for the first time in 60 years, our population has grown and is not declining, i have changed my metaphor. this nation has taught me that i need not be a prisoner of hope. the possibilities in this country, the promise of people coming together, has changed my metaphor. my experience in my great city has changed my metaphor. now i am hopeful unhinged. there is nothing we cannot do. [applause] i end with a question that has been asked since the war of 1812, when a man standing off the coast of our country watching bombs bursting in air penned these words that form a question that we must answer in this generation, that we must rise and tell the truth of who
. >> "washington journal" continues. michael're back with burgess, a republican and vice chairman of the energy and commerce subcommittee. thanks for talking to our viewers. guest: thanks for having me. host: republicans are saying to avoid the automatic spending cuts, we need entitlement reform on the table. president obama said yesterday if we cannot agree to something long-term like entitlement reform, let's do something short-term. do you agree? guest: no. president obama should be talking about the next sequester, because this one is happening. it was postponed to march 1 on the first and january. this is a promise that we made, the congress and the president made to the american people in order to get our fiscal house in order if we could not come up with the cuts, the savings to do that, these cuts would be automatic. host: you are ok with them? guest: i don't like it. the republican house has proposed two alternatives where the sequester might be differently apportioned and there might be some other things like medical liability reform. i am for that, but the senator never took it up. p
years paramilitary operations had consumed a lot of resources, expertise, time, energy, and efforts at the cia. do you believe this has been at the expense of traditional cia responsibility collection, analysis? >> there have been opportunity costs because of the dedication of those resources. i would inventory our resources so they are being dedicated against a wide variety of strategic priorities to protect our country. in terms of operational collection activities worldwide, the analysis being done, what are we doing in these other areas? cyber -- are so many different areas. there is an intersection between counter-terrorism and these other areas. international organized crime. we want to optimize this resources so we can leverage capabilities we have to deal with these challenging issues across a very large globe. >> mr. brennan, you have devoted a great deal of your life to public service, for which i thank you. and you obviously understand the world of intelligence in a way that few people do. you have been an intelligence professional for much of your professional life. in t
, energy. we can't talk about energy in america or the world without that connecting to the environment. and you can't talk about the environment without talking about energy. and you can't talk about energy and the environment without talking about the economy. because it's job withs, it's growth -- it's jobs, it's growth, a nation's competitive position in the world. and so these issues are interrelated. and as my friends who are here representing their country, their people in america's capital tonight, they understand this, and they understand that the great global issues facing us all -- all 6.5 billion people on the face of the earth today -- are, in fact, global. we live in a global community. that global community is underpinned by a global economy. and so whatever framework of challenges you think we face, they are international. proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the environment, energy, terrorism, extremism and maybe the most insidious of all, despair. and within the framework of despair comes hunger and poverty and when man is without dignity, not much else matter
give life, you know, give birth, men have the destructive energy, the destructive force and women might not be able to, you know, pull the trigger. of course, arguments about what about pms, would women be able to act rationally during that period? [laughter] would they be somewhat immobilized? how are they going to have supplies in the battle? are they going to have instead of, you know, cartridges in their belt, are they going to have tampons? [laughter] now it seems antiquated. it was the '90s which doesn't feel, i don't feel that old, but -- [laughter] these were common arguments. and sometimes what was guidance got sort of twisted into policies or practices that really sort of undermined the integration of women. for example, in the army there was guidance that, you know, for healthful purposes women should shower every 72 hours. but then i was in a number of units where somehow that was taken as policy x they said women can't be in combat because women must have showers every 72 hours. [laughter] and there are places where i visited where they were doing extended training exercise
center for energy this was pretty hot halftime show. this happened after that. do you think beyonce had anything to do with this in your expert opinion? >> well it is hard to tell right now. very well could have. i guess we'll have to look at the sequence of events to see when the power outage actually occurred and when the show actually ended and how much stress anything from that show may have put on the electrical infrastructure within the super boehm but right now there really isn't enough evidence to suggest either way that it was caused by the electrical stresses from that show or not. >> there was a lot of energy, certainly during that show. >> yeah. jenna: there is a joint statement released by entergy, new orleans, the power provider to the stadium superdome, the superdome operator. could you translate this for us this is jar most don't understand. a piece of equipment designed to monitor electrical load sensed an be a normality in the system. wins the issue was detected the sensing equipment operated as designed and opened a breaker causing power to be partially cut. what does
this is another signal that our infrastructure is desperately under resourced and that we've got an energy problem? you know, a real crisis that is facing the country? what are your proposals? >> well, i tell you, when it comes to reliability, all you need to do is ask those millions of americans who were focused on the game last night and all of a sudden it wasn't there. so as we look to energy and the key role that it plays in a secure economy, i think you immediate to look no further than the inconvenience that people felt last night. we rolled out an energy proposal this morning that we've been working on for well over a year, and the basic premise is energy is good. pretty simple. manager is good. it's necessary. it defines who we are as a nation. what i am working towards is a proposal that gets under the circumstances to a policy that is affordable, it's abundant, it's clean, it's diverse, and it's secure. if we can work towards all those things, we actually get to a better climate, a better environment. just a place where we are stronger as a nation, and where we're cleaner environmentally
and energy to mail out fee disclosure information to participants that are minimally engaged in the plan and are not going to be interested in the expense ratio offered under that plan. that was the regulation well intended, but didn't have all the impact it was designed to have. trying to manage necessary regulation with regulation that's not going to have a bacon pact, just echoing that important part. >> is this going to get us there that make in the plain simpler? >> i think so. do make say difference for people. very valuable, thank you very much. >> i would like to continue, professor warren, senator warren find of questioning because that's very helpful. i remember in order to be the governor of tennessee, walked across the state many years ago and there's no one to talk to do, the cows are along the road. i was thinking if i got elected, would if i could make a tax form for some sort of list that i could hand to somebody who wants to start a business and safe from the state's point of view, this is everything we care about. these are all the taxes on the regulation, complete us.
is going on in congress. they are extremely passionate and have a lot of energy. they will generate a higher level of interest in the 2014 elections, and we will able to capture that energy and spirit accordingly in the elections -- steer it accordingly in the elections. >> terrific. well, we have reached the end of our time, so i asked you to join me in thanking our panel -- sara chieffo, david kirby, brandon davis, and glen caroline. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] + >> coming out in about 30 minutes, we will take you live to the state department, where outgoing secretary hillary clinton will deliver remarks on for employees. she officially steps down today. senator john kerry of massachusetts was confirmed by the senate on tuesday to be her replacement. he is expected to be sworn in the day by the supreme court justice sonia sotomayor. in the meantime, we will have live coverage of the secretary clinton's earmarks around at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. president obama will honor the recipi
. now a government panel's proposing key ideas that could potentially transform japan's energy. we have more on this story. >> reporter: after a year long debate the panel presented its report to the government. >> translator: the government must successfully overhaul the electricity system to live up to the people's expectations. >> reporter: japan's energy system remains a monopoly. they operate independently and rarely provide power to one another. the utility companies have maintained that this is the best way to secure a stable power supply. but the nuclear disaster exposed problems with this approach. tepco failed to provide enough power dome pen said for the loss of fukushima. there were rolling blackouts in the capital. public confidence eroded. in response the former panel.ment set up the reform friday's report included three main recommendations. one, increase competition by bringing new generators to the market by 2016. two, set up an organization to improve connections between power grids. finally split up power generation and transmission operations as early as 2018. the pa
diplomacy and the creative energy of our people remains unrivaled. no, it's because as the world has changed so too has the leverage and power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think of it like this. truman and acheson were building the parthenon with classical geometry and clear lines. the pillars were a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by the major powers and that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. but time takes its toll even on the greatest edifice. and we do need a new architecture for this new world. more frank gehry ben formal greek. [laughter] think of it. now some of his work at first might appear haphazard but in fact it's highly intentional and sophisticated. where once a few strong columns could hold up the weight of the world, today we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. now of course american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership or go as we saw from the intervention to stop the massacre in libya to the rate that brought bin laden to justice, ther
significant is it? >> this affects the 9.0 monster earthquake that has a thousand times more energy than what rocked the solomon islands just yesterday. we're talking about the 800-pound gorilla of earthquake. by rights they shouldn't exist. when they exist, they dissipate the energy. so we shouldn't have 9 pont 0 which devastated fukushima. now we realize a fault line is like a battery, accumulating energy across many cycles and it's game-changer. it means we may have to rewrite all the textbooks on these. >> so we can predict these? >> no. it means it's even more predictable. even a minor fault can sustain a 9.0 earthquake when by rights we should be. we're back to the dark ages where even off the coast of the united states, even an innocent fault may sustain the monster 9.0. >> based on this new theory, could any of these super quakes occur in the united states? >> one is the cascade ya off the coast of seattle, portland, and the pacific northwest. it's sustained earthquakes before and it means they could be unpredictable. building up energy, even though we don't know there's battery there
diplomacy and the energy of our people remain unrivaled. as the world has changed, so have the levers that can change in shape international affairs. truman and acheson were building the parthenon with clear lines. the pillars or a handful of big institutions dominated by major powers. that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. but time takes its toll even on the greatest atedifice. we need a new architect for this world. more frank gehry than formal greek. think of it. of this work might appear have hazard. it is sophisticated -- some of his work might appear haphazard. we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. as we saw from the intervention to stop a massacre in libya, there will always be times when it is necessary to use force. america is the ability to project power over the globe remains essential. i'm proud of the partnerships the state department has formed with the pentagon. america's traditional allies and friends in europe and east asia remain in valuable partners in nearly everything we do. we've spent energy strengthening those bonds over the p
that will help montana to lead america to energy independence. with responsible development of our coal, wind, oil and gas, hydropower, biofuels and geothermal capacity, we are creating jobs, and we are strengthening our rural economies. but for some communities in eastern montana, the rapid growth associated with the energy boom is creating immediate infrastructure challenges. that's why i've proposed creating a grant program for communities affected by oil and gas development. i ask that we invest $15 million in providing matching funds to affected cities and towns, areas that don't always get a share of the increased revenues that county governments and school districts receive from oil and gas development. there are challenges, but there's opportunities for the whole state with this development. i do hope that you'll join me in addressing those challenges. [applause] we must also meet our responsibility to fix a long-term problem created by our predecessors. i've outlined a detailed plan that will shore up our public retirement systems and do so without raising taxes. i look forward to wo
to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping down. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt and laid off all its workers. chu will stay on at least until the end of february, or until president obama names his successor. nasa paused today to remember the lives of seven astronauts who died ten years ago when space shuttle "columbia" broke apart in the air over texas. a few hundred people gathered at kennedy space center in florida, including family members and other astronauts. the accident happened as the shuttle was returning home with only 16 minutes left till landing. the brash, bold-talking former mayor of new york city, ed koch, died today of congestive heart failure at a hospital in new york. >> good morning. i'm ed koch, and i'm running for mayor. how am i doing? >> sreenivasan: ed koch was most at home on the streets of manhattan. a quintessential new yorker, the larger than life koch, who ran city hall from 1978 to
but there is a lot that the person must register if they devote energy tot time and firearms with the goal of making a profit. faces five years in prison. >> the national transportation board confirms a battery did on thelectrical fires boeing 787 dreamliner. investigators say the lithium batteries used on the overheat.an the resulting fires are hard to extinguish and the spread quickly. >> this investigation has demonstrated a short circuit in single cell can propagate to cells and result in fire.and >> the methods used to inspect the battery need to be reviewed. all 50 of the reminders will grounded until the fixed and the plane is safe to fly. today's hearing for the cia expected toinee was be spirited. why things got heated even asked theirkers questions. >> leon panetta on what american forces from lives.more >> who has stepped in to help students.n >> leon panetta says the speed the attack on the consulate u.s. forces from to saveng in time lives. told a panel today there were signs of an imminent attack last september. chris stevens and three other americans were killed. not as the raid was a
about how we create jobs and help businesses grow and put ourselves on a path towards energy independence and that's not always an easy balancing act. but with enthusiasm and skill and dedication, that's exactly what ken salazar's done for the last four years. we were just reminiscing a little bit. i've known ken since we were both running for the senate together and became the only two incoming democrats in our senate class. pete remembers this. it was a lonely time. we actually lived in the same building when we first arrived in washington. and, ken, you'll recall, it was a little discouraging because basically everybody else that lived there was 20 or 25. so we were the two geriatrics in this building. but i came to appreciate quickly, not just him. not only did i come to appreciate his jump shot -- he's surprisingly quick on the court -- but also his patriotism and his belief that we have a responsibility to care for the land with which we've been blessed. it's not surprising that ken feels this way. his ancestors were living here before the mayflower set sail. as he expl
the e.u. policies are more oriented toward dwrowt. and much of the time and energy in this year of italian government has been devoted precisely to that. and we have been among the pushing facto at the table of the european counsel including adoption for the fact for growth, and also with the daily insistence on the single market being taken more seriously. we all know that europe is based on the single market, but we also know, as prime minister cameron, i heard just say there isn't really single market for energy for many of the services for the digital services in europe. and finally, we insist with some success in the recent european counsel to have a more forward-looking understanding in europe of the role of the good public investment particular for the interconnections for the infrastructure, investment, and this is something that we should also take in to account in our view, when we move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. it's a ganz commonsense economics and history not to see the potential for economies of scale of an e.u. project
of maintaining energy flows. >> i take issue with the conspiracy theorists who argue, for example, that wars are conducted merely for oil, um, and then i, i, but i also take issues with those that argue that economic issues should not factor into american foreign policy thinking when, when it comes to intervention at all. both of those i think are, are, in reductive and naive. and a u.s. policy maker has to keep both of them in mind when making a decision about whether or not to intervene. (instrumental music) >> rwanda, bosnia, somalia, libya... at one point political violence in each of these faraway places was claiming thousands of lives and it was in our power to stop the bloodshed. at kitchen tables and in town halls across the u.s. many asked, "if not us, who?" >> humanitarianism is something that's intrinsic to our country. uh, we can't turn a blind eye to people who are suffering. well i think it creates some kind of leadership challenge for us to be able to think through what can we do? what are the limits to what we can do? >> certainly the united states have intervened on humanita
technologies to bring us energy. we have more natural gas than saudi arabia has oil. so there's some changes. people are coming back here because it's cheaper to do business in america. i think what's more important is the average american. the average american, if we're sitting and waiting for the government to come up with the answer for us, the president to come up with a vision, you'll have a problem. if you've been on unemployment for 12 million americans, those jobs probably aren't coming back. it's time to retool and say where is the next opportunity, is it in health care, is it in green. where am i going to get the skills. the government is going to step up and say here's a pathway. you've got to find it yourself. >> how morally responsible should big, successful companies, we've seen starbucks do this, apple dip its toe in the water. >> you talked about that the last time i was on. >> apple has since then done so. it was a start. but it's about the principle, really, of great american companies in the tech world. they lead the world. but a lot of the stuff's outsourced outside of am
maxx hd by motorola. >> the source of energy that's becoming khraoerp, we all know -- cheaper, we all know it's cleaner and more businesses are starting to take notice. we've got to double down on a clean-energy industry that's never been more promising. doubling the clean energy we use. to jump-start a home-grown clean-energy industry. >>gretchen: remember when president obama touted the future of green energy and pumped billions of tax dollars into solar energy. today the future looks dim as investments in green energy are beginning to dry up. >>steve: as the subsidies dry up, so does the business. because? >> there's tons of jobs and the entire industry is relying upon these billions of dollars, and we know where those billions have gotten up. according to my research, .1% of the grid comes from solar power. you think about the money that's gone in, billions, and the output. almost nothing; right? now wall street -- this is a big business issue, and what everybody is talking about is what's going to happen with the shraor industry? -- going to happen with the solar industry? what i
brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change and the tremendous opportunity that clean energy represents for our country. this again is the president speaking. during his time as secretary, steve helped my administration move america toward real energy independence. over the past four years we have doubled the use of renewable energy, dramatically reduced our dependence on foreign oil and put our country on a path to win the global race for clean energy jobs. you can readed the full statement at your leisure. without that i'll go to questions. >> thanks. does the president consider the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack and does have he information about who may have perpetrated it? >> that's an excellent question. the act -- a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror. it is a terrorist attack. however, we do not know at this point who is responsible or the motivations behind the attack. the attack itself is clearly an act of terror. >> on another topic, the b
to adopt an action plan for the next two years. they want to hold hearings on telecommunications and energy policy and health policy. we have sent over 20 letters asking for a simple theory bringing in the scientists. we have not even gotten answers. we will offer amendments unless the committee agrees, amendments that will at least require a hearing with scientists. how can you say the science does not support the position and then not hear from the scientists? republicans have put themselves in a real box. i know many republicans do not support this point of view, this idea that nothing is happening and we do not need to worry. the evidence is there. they are hearing it from people around the country and we are paying for it in support for the victims of hurricane sandy and the droughts of the farmers and everything else carry >> a democratic column. hello. -- everything else. >> a democratic caller. >> a couple of years ago, when the flu was quite serious in the united states, i was working in special ed. the school closed down for an entire week. the teachers were quite joyful as they m
. the energy relationship between the united states and canada is vital to the future of both our countries. it's an interest we share transcending political lines and geographic boundaries." the letter goes on and talks about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the o
, our sustainable, profitable growth, no question in my mind is going to come from avionics, from energy, from health care, from these markets that we're just scratching the surface in terms of technology applications. >> host: will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> guest: i don't know. >> host: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year.
, he held my administration move america from real energy independence. we have doubled the use of renewable energy, dramatically reduce our dependence on foreign oil. you can read the full statement at your leisure. i will go to questions >> does the president considered the attack in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is, by definition, an act of terror. we do not know at this point who is responsible or the motivations behind the attack. the attack itself is clearly an act of terror. >> the birth control -- is this recognition that the initial rules were an overreach? >> not at all. for details about the rulemaking process on which there is news today, i refer you to hhs. i would remind you of a policy that the president outlined last year. in outlining it, he set two important criteria. one, we have to ensure that women have access to preventive services like contraception. the policy also respects religious elites. those criteria have been followed by the department in this role. as part of this process, there is more common
the capabilities of nuclear energy or whatever, but not pursuing nuclear weapons. are they pursuing nuclear weapons? are you still confident they are not pursuing nuclear weapons? >> what i've said, and i will say today, is that the intelligence we have is they have not made the decision to proceed with the development of a nuclear weapon. they are developing and enriching uranium. they continue to do that. >> why do you believe they are doing that? >> they say in order to develop their own energy source. i think it is suspect that they continue to enrich uranium because that is dangerous, and that violates international -- >> you believe they are probably pursuing a weapon but the intelligence isn't there? >> i can't tell you they are in fact pursuing a weapon because that's not what intelligence says they are doing right now. but every indication is they want to continue to increase their nuclear capability. and that's a concern, and that's what we're asking them to stop doing. >> general dempsey, senator hagel said he was -- he was briefed his first trip to the pentagon on potential plans, milit
. the gun bill will be piecemeal, as howard was mentioning. >> next up, energy reform. i'm going to be bullish because it's friday. prime minister we will examine the growing backlash against bush's brain and other symptoms of a party in disarray just ahead. at tyco integrated security, we consider ourselves business optimizers. how? by building custom security solutions that integrate video, access control, fire and intrusion protection. all backed up with world-class monitoring centers, thousands of qualified technicians, and a personal passion to help protect your business. when your business is optimized like that, there's no stopping you. we are tyco integrated security. and we are sharper. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and infla
that energy is offshore. we might see a couple snow flurries at the mason-dixon line this morning. there was just a dusting in hagerstown and martinsburg. there were a couple inches of snow in the panhandle of west virginia. nothing but clouds in d.c.. 31 in arlington. 30 degrees in silver spring and germantown. 29 in sterling and the chantilly. 34 degrees in woodbrige this morning. no complaining about the temperatures, a pretty typical for this time of year. mostly cloudy today, high temperatures in the low to mid 40's. that's not shabby. campus seven-day forecast, looking really good. another clipper tonight. snow flurries more than anything. the best chance of getting a dusting will be to the north again. 45 degrees on wednesday. pushing 50 by the weekend. a chance of rain on friday and next monday. jamee, do you love pancakes? >> i do. i love this wesweets. nice and quiet around the region, virginia maryland, beltway planes are open. john hanson highway right there. no problems out of annapolis or bowie. columbia down through to the beltway and rte. 29 at fairland road, not m
solyndra alone is stepping down. energy secretary steven chu offering his resignation today. he was highly criticized for its handling of the $528 million loan to the solar panel maker, which later went bankrupt. despite the blunder he is leaving with obama's support and his pride intact. he said, came with streams and leaving with a set of accomplishments that we should all be proud of. not all of his dreams came true. back in 2008 he famously said we as a nation needed to boost gas prices to levels -- levels seen in europe. although he eventually walked back those comments, i say his departure could not come soon enough. $8 a gallon. that's my "2 cents more." that's it for tonight on "the willis report." thank you for joining as. do not forget to record airshow if you cannot catch us live. have a great weekend and a great night. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. the dow jones industrials tonight above 14,000 for the first time since october of 2007. it just 155 points from its all-time high. the s&p regaining the 1500 level, the labor department today reporting 157,000 jobs were created
in the flight, had seen the hole in the wing. that would have mobilized all their energies and the whole country's and the world's energies. they would have tried to find ways to macgyver the wing and find something on board to stick in the whole. they had to find ways to get the other ship that was being canted down into space sooner. and if they didn't have enough air on board, they would have found ways to get other rockets from other countries. and there were some available, to throw fly canisters up into space where the shuttle could have chased them down and grabbed them before the shuttle's own power ran out. those things might have happened. in hindsight, the accident investigation board looked at them and couldn't really figure out any way that was surely going to work. but they would have tried. >> yeah. >> well, a story that surrounds american heros who were lost doing their best for america. james oberg, thank you so much for your time tonight. i appreciate it. >> thank you. >> that's "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. >> good evening. and happy
military, the size of our economy, the influence of our diplomacy and the creative energy of our people remain unrivaled. no, it's because, as the world has changed, so, too, have the levers of power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i've come to think of it like this. truman and atchison were building the parthenon with classical geometry and clear lines. the pillars were a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by major powers and that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity but time takes its toll even on the greatest edifice. and we do need a new architecture for this new world. more frank geary than formal greek. think of it, some of his work at first might appear haphazard but in fact it's highly intentional and sophisticated. where once a few strong columns could hold up the weight of the world, today, we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. now, of course, american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership. as we saw from the intervention to stop a massacre in libya, to the raid
. this is pretty good as well. they said this energy background could diminish disapproval in the oil and gas industry which says the obama administration could limit production. that is not true. but that's what they say any way. do you remember this exchange? >> romney: you cut permits in half. >> obama: not true. >> romney: how much did you cut them. production on government land is down 14%. and production on gas is down 9%. >> obama: is it's just not true. >> cenk: well, president obama was correct there. and i would say unfortunately because when you look at this chart, how much land that the president has conserved whew, disastrous, not only did clinton clean his clock but so did george w. bush and ronald reagan. he preserved less land for public use than george w. bush. of course, obama likes to break bush's record and go further right, and he did in this case as well and opened up a tremendous amount of land to drill on. i want to bring in a couple of experts, michael shure our political correspondent, and then mark flogl with greenpeace research unit. thank you for joining us. i wan
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